Rocio Del Mar

The Captain and crew of the liveaboard dive boat Rocio Del Mar welcome you aboard as you embark on an amazing scuba diving adventure on one of three exciting itineraries: the Sea of Cortez Midriff Islands in the Gulf of California; the Revillagigedo Archipelago, also known as “Socorro”; and the Baja California Peninsula, or “Baja”.

Sea of Cortez Midriff Islands

The Midriff Islands are located in the northern part of the Sea of Cortez. Your weeklong dive adventure aboard the liveaboard dive boat Rocio Del Mar departs from Puerto Peñasco, and travels to the islands of Salsipuedes, Angel, and San Pedro Martir. The fertile waters of the Sea of Cortez, located between the Baja California Peninsula and the mainland of Mexico, are home to many endemic species found only here. Scuba diving and snorkeling at the Sea of Cortez will provide a truly memorable experience, thanks to the diversity of both the marine life and the terrain at the Sea of Cortez. With its clear blue waters, abundant sea life, white sandy beaches, and spectacular vistas, you will enjoy a vacation of a lifetime.

Photo and video opportunities abound with everything this beautiful sea has to offer. Home to more than 850 species of reef fish and enormous living coral reefs, you will quickly come to understand why legendary scuba diver Jacques Cousteau described the Sea of Cortez as the “world’s aquarium.” You will encounter Whale Sharks, Mobula and Manta Rays, large and small whale species, and colonies of Sea Lions. The waters are usually calm, and most dives require a moderate level of scuba diving experience, although some dives are advanced. From May through June, the water temperatures in the northern Sea of Cortez are usually between 72°-75°F (22°-24°C), and average 75°-80°F (24°-26°C) in July. In August and September the waters can warm up to 85°F (29°C), and then cool back down to 80°F (26°C) or below in October. Visibility at the Sea of Cortez ranges between 50 and 100 plus feet (15-30+ m.).

While at Angel Island, dive sites you may visit in the area of Refugio Bay include Angel Rock, El Jardin, La Vela, and Lolo’s Cove. At Las Viboras dive site, you will make both daytime and night dives. Your next stop is at Salsipuedes, where you may visit such dive sites as Los Cuervos, In Animas, El Caballo, and El Lavadero, which includes both day- and nighttime dives. When you head to San Pedro Martir, the potential dive sites you will visit include Ravijunco, Coromel, El Arroyo, and Chayo’s Cove.

Before taking your first dive, you will be required to show the Dive master your C-card or other recognized proof of scuba diving certification. Because you will be making up to four dives each day, it is recommended that you bring a 3-5mm. wetsuit, hood, or light hooded vest for adequate thermal protection. You are also required to bring your own safety sausage and whistle.

The Revillagigedos Islands – Socorro

The Revillagigedo Islands—also known more commonly as Socorro— lie some 250 miles (400 km.) south of Los Cabos, Mexico. The Rocio Del Mar takes you on a week-long encounter with giant Pacific Manta Rays, Dolphins, Sharks, and even Humpback Whales. The Revillagigedos Islands consist of four volcanic islands: San Benedicto Island, Socorro Island, Roca Partida, and Clarion. Because of the big animal encounters they provide, some also call this archipelago the Mexican Galapagos.

Pelagics are the main attraction for scuba diving at Socorro. Because of its location in open ocean waters, Socorro attracts large concentrations of big animals. You will see a variety of sharks including Hammerheads, Galapagos, White- and Silver-tipped Sharks, and Silkies. Other big animals you will see include Wahoo, enormous Tuna, and huge schools of Jacks. Between December and March, the mighty Humpback Whales migrate into these waters to breed and calve. Divers may be fortunate enough to encounter these majestic creatures or hear the mating song of the males as they travel through the Sea of Cortez.

Your typical Socorro itinerary departs from San Jose del Cabo. The Rocio Del Mar must travel approximately 24 hours to reach the Socorro Islands, where you will scuba dive at the islands of San Benedicto, Roca Partida, and Socorro. You can plan on making 3-4 dives each day. Water temperatures here range between 70°-78°F (21°-25°C), and the waters can sometimes be choppy.

A variety of marine life gathers at San Benedicto Island from miles around, including Whale Sharks, Tiger Sharks, and, if you are patient, you will be able to experience the magic of the giant Pacific Manta Rays. Some are as large as 22 feet (7 m.) across, and you will be amazed by their acrobatics and graceful moves. The Mantas often willingly and deliberately initiate interaction with divers, almost inviting you to swim alongside them. Have your camera ready for these excellent photo and video opportunities.
A favorite dive site a San Benedicto is the Boiler, a large pinnacle rising from the depths of the ocean to within just a few feet of the surface. This sea mount also serves as a cleaning station for the Mantas.

Socorro Island is about 30 miles (48 km.) south of San Benedicto. This island is approximately 9 by 10 miles (14 by 16 km.) in size and is home to the Mexican Naval Station. Rising up in the center of the island some 3,700 feet (1,130 m.) above sea level is the volcano Mt. Evermann. Socorro Island provides many interesting dive sites such as Aquarium and Cabo Pearce.

At only 115 feet high (35 m.) and 300 feet (91 m.) from one end to the other, Roca Partida is the smallest island in the Revillagigedo Archipelago, and appears to be two separate rocks rising from the sea. The wall of this pinnacle provides refuge to many animals on its shelves and ridges, and drops straight down Here you will also see groups of White-tipped Sharks sleeping in large caves at depths of about 40 feet (12 m.). Other pelagics you may encounter include schools of Hammerhead Sharks, Galapagos Sharks, Silkies, White-tipped Sharks, giant Manta Rays, Dolphins, and the occasional Whale Sharks.

Before taking your first dive, you will be required to show the Dive master your C-card or other recognized proof of scuba diving certification. Because you will be making up to four dives each day, it is recommended that you bring a 5mm. wetsuit, hood, or light hooded vest for adequate thermal protection. You are also required to bring your own safety sausage and whistle. From January through April, the water temperatures average 72°F (22°C), and in May they can warm up to around 80°F (26°C).

Sea of Cortez at Baja California

You can enjoy an 11-night scuba diving adventure to Baja California on the liveaboard dive boat Rocio Del Mar twice each year: in the summer and again in the fall. Summer itineraries travel south to north, departing from San Jose del Cabo and return to Puerto Peñasco. Fall itineraries depart from Puerto Peñasco and return to San Jose del Cabo, traveling north to south. The waters between the Northern and Southern Sea of Cortez contain an amazing bio-diversity with spectacular marine life. Home to more than 850 species of reef fish and enormous living coral reefs, you will quickly come to understand why legendary scuba diver Jacques Cousteau described the Sea of Cortez as the “world’s aquarium.” Some of what you may encounter includes Sea Lions, Dolphins, Marlins, various species of Whales, and Mantas. Ashore you will see Blue- and Brown-footed Boobies, Pelicans, Frigatebirds, Cormorants, and the endemic Yellow-footed Gulls.

Highlights of your Baja California itinerary include visits to Cabo Pulmo where you may dive La Esperanza, Los Morros, El Bajo, and at night, La Paz. At Isla Espiritu Santo you will dive two wrecks at Los Islotes dive site. At San Pedro Martir you may dive El Arroyo, Punta Este, and Ravijunco. Dive sites at Animas and Salsipuedes include El Lavadero, Los Cuervos, and El Caballo. At Angel Island you may dive Angel Rock, La Vela, Lolo’s Cove, and El Jardin.

Water temperature in the northern Sea of Cortez can range from 75°-85°F (24°-29°C) between June and August. The water remains equally warm in September, but then begins to cool down to 80°F (26°C) or below in October. Before taking your first dive, you will be required to show the Dive master your C-card or other recognized proof of scuba diving certification. Because you will be making up to four dives each day, it is recommended that you bring a 3-5mm. wetsuit, hood, or light hooded vest for adequate thermal protection. You are also required to bring your own safety sausage and whistle.

As with any liveaboard dive boat, itineraries on the Rocio Del Mar are dependent on prevailing sea and weather conditions, and are subject to change so as to ensure you have the best liveaboard and scuba diving experience possible. The Captain and crew of the Rocio Del Mar strive to provide scuba divers and vacationers with high quality and innovative liveaboard experiences. In addition to unmatched scuba diving and amazing photo and video opportunities, guests aboard the Rocio Del Mar will enjoy excellent accommodations and delicious meals as part of their vacation package. Whether traveling the usual Rocio Del Mar itinerary or a customized itinerary on a private charter, their dive boat affords guests both safety and comfort as they travel to the best diving locations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.